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The+university+Chorus%2C+Bella+Voce+and+the+Concert+Choir+joined+the+Northshore+Choral+Society+in+performing+the+concert+%22I+Dream+A+World%22+featuring+music+that+originated+from+languages+around+the+world.
The university Chorus, Bella Voce and the Concert Choir joined the Northshore Choral Society in performing the concert

The university Chorus, Bella Voce and the Concert Choir joined the Northshore Choral Society in performing the concert "I Dream A World" featuring music that originated from languages around the world.

Jacob Summerville

Jacob Summerville

The university Chorus, Bella Voce and the Concert Choir joined the Northshore Choral Society in performing the concert "I Dream A World" featuring music that originated from languages around the world.

Jacob Summerville, Staff Reporter

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Several music ensembles performed works of music that originated in the languages of Estonian, Korean, Swedish, Norwegian, Swahili, Spanish and Arabic.

The university Chorus, Bella Voce and the Concert Choir joined the Northshore Choral Society in performing the concert “I Dream A World” at the First Baptist Church in Hammond on Wednesday, Oct. 3 at 7:30 p.m.

Later that evening, the university Concert Choir presented the song “I Dream A World,” which concert choir conductor Dr. Alissa Rowe, director of choral activities and associate professor of voice, described as a “journey.” During the song, a slideshow consisting of the chorale members’ responses were played, which all began with the phrase, “I Dream A World.”

Another piece that appealed to Rowe and a performer was “Refuge” by Sara Teasdale. Rowe stated that for some music students, “music is their refuge,” and that this piece expresses their “love, fear and hopes.”

Bella Voce member Ariel George, a junior music major, described how the piece relates to the multicultural theme of the evening.

“I feel like ‘Refuge’ really represents the music department as a whole because it unifies us,” said George. “Unity, off of the multicultural situation, the whole past couple of concerts actually have been multicultural, and it’s because no matter how much it’s harped upon, it can always be a great thing. It can always be more.”

After the performance, Hillary Smith, a music teacher from Covington, said that the show was “celebratory” since the night was filled with words from various languages.

“The common theme was a celebration of some sort,” said Smith. “So, it was nice to see the celebration of life throughout the whole concert.”

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