The significance behind wearing green and gold

Emily+Waddell%2C+a+junior+sport+management+major%2C+Mary+Anna+Jambon%2C+a+junior+sport+management+major%2C+and+Nadia+Whitfield%2C+a+senior+sport+management+major%2C+showcase+their+department+apparel.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

The significance behind wearing green and gold

Emily Waddell, a junior sport management major, Mary Anna Jambon, a junior sport management major, and Nadia Whitfield, a senior sport management major, showcase their department apparel.

Emily Waddell, a junior sport management major, Mary Anna Jambon, a junior sport management major, and Nadia Whitfield, a senior sport management major, showcase their department apparel.

Johnathan Zeringue/The Lion’s Roar

Emily Waddell, a junior sport management major, Mary Anna Jambon, a junior sport management major, and Nadia Whitfield, a senior sport management major, showcase their department apparel.

Johnathan Zeringue/The Lion’s Roar

Johnathan Zeringue/The Lion’s Roar

Emily Waddell, a junior sport management major, Mary Anna Jambon, a junior sport management major, and Nadia Whitfield, a senior sport management major, showcase their department apparel.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Wearing university apparel allows students to showcase their school spirit and represent their institution.

Kristina McBride, coordinator of tutoring and record keeping for Student Support Services, shared why students benefit from wearing school apparel.

“Students feel a sense of belonging and pride when they are able to represent the university they belong to,” said McBride. “It connects students to each other regardless of their cultures, religions, club and organization affiliations, majors and interests.”

Juanesha Davis, a sophomore social work major, explained the importance for her as an orientation leader to wear university gear.

“Wearing Southeastern apparel as an OL distinguishes students, such as myself, that involve themselves in leadership,” shared Davis. “The apparel also displays my love for my university. I feel that it is imperative to represent the institution that is evolving me as a person.”

Sydnee Clark, a sophomore athletic training major, wears designated school apparel because it is required for her field of work.

“It’s about me wanting to look professional in uniform,” stated Clark. “The athletes and coaches will be able to recognize me. It helps everyone know that I am an athletic trainer and limits confusion.”

In addition, “Lion Up Tuesdays” provide the opportunity for both students and faculty to show off their university apparel throughout campus.

“’Lion Up Tuesdays’ are a chance for the students, faculty and staff to show and share the pride they have in their institution,” shared McBride. “I also think it’s common for schools and universities to have designated pride days as it creates a feeling of camaraderie across campus.”

The costs of university apparel may restrict some students from being able to afford school clothing. Jasmyn Donsereaux, a junior early childhood education major, compared the university prices to off-campus stores.

“At other places, a shirt would normally cost from $9.99 to $12.99,” expressed Donsereaux. “Here, a T-shirt starts at $12.99, and the prices are often not reasonable for students and commuters.”

According to Donsereaux, the university can offer more ways for students to get involved with wearing green and gold.

“There should be mini-events held by the ‘S’ or in the breezeway or student park,” advised Donseraux. “They can award students who have on Southeastern gear, such as how CAB does. More organizations should also try to get involved as well.”

Miss Southeastern Louisiana University Chelsey Blank, a junior accounting major, discussed her experience with purchasing university apparel in relation to buying a boutique green and gold dress.

“If you buy a shirt from the bookstore that’s Southeastern apparel, it’s cheaper than buying a whole dress at a boutique,” shared Blank. “I know the boutiques around here can be pricey. While they try to do Southeastern discounts, I’m in the process of also trying to get them to do a Miss Southeastern discount.”

Blank believes the university can do more to make its apparel more affordable for students.

“The bookstore offers some good deals at certain times for us to be able to show school pride,” explained Blank. “I do feel though that they should maybe give coupons to students that participate in ‘Lion Up Tuesday.’ This can maybe include 10 percent off your next purchase if they see you’re wearing something that’s green or gold. I also think that would be something to implement in order to bring more attraction and traffic to the bookstore.”

CORRECTION: The image caption originally identified the women as Mahayla Taylor, Deven Daniels and Runquiesha Myles. The correct names and majors have been updated – May 3, 2019