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Students to advocate for higher education

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Students to advocate for higher education

Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

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Over a thousand students, faculty and alumni from nine universities will gather to celebrate the University of Louisiana System.

On April 10, “ULS Day at the Capitol” will be held on the State Capitol Lawn.

The system plans for the day to be filled with activities, performances and demonstrations to advocate for support of higher education such as academic programs, demonstrations of robotics and drones, arts and cow roping performances as well as performances from singers, dance groups, mascots and spirit squads. Free lunch will also be provided. Speaker at the event will include Governor John Bel Edwards, Mark Romero, chair of the ULS Board of Supervisors, and James Henderson, president of ULS.

ULS includes Grambling State University, Louisiana Tech University, McNeese State University, Nicholls State University, Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Southeastern Louisiana University, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, University of Louisiana at Monroe and the University of New Orleans.

The system was founded in 1974 as the Board of Trustees for State Colleges and Universities, then changed its name in 1998. According to the ULS website, it is the largest higher education system in Louisiana and one of the largest in the nation.

Of the Board of Supervisors’ 16 members, 15 are appointed by the governor while one is selected by the ULS Student Government Association presidents. This year, the student board member is Richard Davis Jr., president of Southeastern Louisiana University’s SGA.

Davis described the event as a festival-type atmosphere that involves student participation.

“‘ULS Day’ is an event where we hear from our state and system leaders and enjoy interactive academic program displays,” said Davis.

Davis believes that the event heavily impacts the higher education system.

“We are at an advantage because many legislators are alumni/supporters of our institutions and we provide a large positive impact on the state’s economy,” shared Davis. “Also, by having students at the event, our legislators will be able to see how invested we are when it comes to our education.”

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