Young dancers and cheerleaders unite

At the Lionettes and cheerleaders clinic a Lionette teaches some girls how to sassy walk for their upcoming performance at a basketball game.

At the Lionettes and cheerleaders clinic a Lionette teaches some girls how to sassy walk for their upcoming performance at a basketball game.
Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

To raise money, the cheerleaders and Lionettes hosted a cheer and dance clinic for young girls ages 5 to 12.

On Saturday, Nov. 5 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the cheerleaders taught cheers and chants while the Lionettes taught dance technique. The older girls also learned stunting. After lunch, the girls learned a short routine to be performed at Friday’s basketball game.

“Today, we have a cheer and dance kids camp where the kids can come and learn dances and cheers,” said Ashlin Nicosia, a junior communication major. “They have a stunt clinic, a technique clinic and they can have fun. They also get to perform at a basketball game next Friday.”

 

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The clinic was designed so young girls could see what being a member of the cheerleaders and Lionettes is like.

“We’re doing it kinda just to get the kids involved, and so they can kinda get a little taste of what goes on here, what we do, what cheer does and let them have the opportunity to dance at a basketball game,” said Bailey Boudreaux, a sophomore kinesiology major.

Nicosia felt it would help girls to be more involved in the community and Southeastern Sprit Sqaud. Nicosia thought the clinic achieved its goals.

“I think it’s been very effective,” said Nicosia. “I think we have a good turnout. We have a lot of kids. We have a really great energy going on so, I think it was very beneficial.”

The cheerleaders and Lionettes divided the girls into three groups based on age: 5 to 6 years old, 7 to 9 years old and 10 to 12 years old and taught a slightly more difficult version of choreography as the ages increased.

“We started to prepare for this on Tuesday,” said Re’Jon Alexander, a sophomore kinesiology major. “All we did was get together and make a dance for each section of groups. There’s three sections, and we started from 5 to age 12.”

Susan Oufnac, a freshman social work major, thinks there will be more clinics in the future.

“It’s a big way to help raise money for the program,” said Oufnac. “Overall, it was a good experience just cause all the kids that showed up, a really good turnout in my eyes. I thought more kids than expected showed up.”

Maranda Scopes, a freshman nursing major enjoyed herself and also thought it went well.

“I think it was very successful and I think they really enjoyed it,” said Scopes. “It’s fun showing your passion to someone else and making that their passion.”

 

A cheerleader teaches stunting, right.

A cheerleader teaches stunting.
Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

 

 

 

 

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