NAACP hosts talent showcase for Black History Month

Eflow rapped as the first performer at Concrete Jungle, a talent showcase hosted by the NAACP. The NAACP hosted this event in honor of Black History Month on Thursday, Feb. 9, at 8 p.m. The event showcased a variety of rappers, singers and poets. Many of the performers were signed to record labels and used this as an opportunity to promote their music.

In honor of Black History Month, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People hosted a talent showcase called Concrete Jungle.

On Thursday, Feb. 9 at 8 p.m., people gathered in the Student Union Theater to watch students and alumni of various ethnicity, age and gender perform.

The performers sang, rapped and performed poetry. Some did original songs while others did covers.

 

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“One of the singers sang one of my favorite songs I listen to almost every day,” said Brielle Garner, a junior communication major. “It’s called ‘Bad Blood.’ I just wanted to see. I don’t stay on campus on Thursdays, so I just wanted to see the events and know what’s going on.”

Participants had to audition for the showcase.

“I felt really great about my performance,” said Andrea Kaigler, a junior industrial technology major who performed under the stage name Drea. “It was pretty good. The crowd vibed with me really well. I liked it. Everything was good. A few friends of mine told me about the show, so I decided to go and try and audition for it.”

Kaigler draws on her past for inspiration for her music.

“What inspires my music is a lot of things I go through, past relationships, past trials and tribulations, just a lot of things I go through in life,” said Kaigler. “My music is more realistic than a lot of people’s, I have to say.”

DohDollars and Chamille, who hosted the event, hyped the crowd throughout the show.

“I really did enjoy it,” said Chamille Muse, a junior criminal justice major. “I liked all the performers. They were really nice. I can’t remember her name. I want to say her name was Darrionne. Her poem, I loved her poem. Her poem was very touching, and I loved what Jessica sung. I loved her singing as well. I’m a member of the NAACP organization, so I decided to host it. I’m on the committee.”

The last performer of the night, Papawill, interacted with the crowd as he walked through the theater.

“I felt good about my performance,” said Willie Williams, or Papawill, an alumnus of the university. “The audience was engaged. They were singing my songs before I finished them, and that’s always a good sign. My music is a little different than what the average college kid is listening to, but I work hard on my music to make sure it’s diverse and eclectic and relatable to everybody.”

Williams’ music is formed from his many inspirations.

“Life, the people that do like me, the people that don’t like me, being challenged to impress people inspires me, nature, struggle, happiness, joy, all of human emotion and basically the sound and feel of guitar mixed with all that inspires me to keep writing,” said Williams.

The audience responded well to the talent that was presented.

“I really loved the show,” said Destiny Shaw, a freshman early childhood education major. “It was really nice. I liked how all the artist came out and really showed their different culture and everything else. The most memorable was basically the poetry and the singers. I liked how they came out, and they just expressed themselves. I really wanted to get involved with this school. I’m a freshman, and I’m trying to find out all the fun things they have on campus.”

 

Christian, top right, sang for the showcase receiving positive feedback from the audience. The NAACP hosted this event in honor of Black History Month on Thursday, Feb. 9, at 8 p.m. The event showcased a variety of rappers, singers and poets. Many of the performers were signed to record labels and used this as an opportunity to promote their music.
Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

 

 

An artist using the stage name Jigga Joy rapped a song with a hype man. The show was structured in two halves with an intermission in between. During the intermission, there was a cypher, rap battle, which an artist using the stage name Magi won. Then there was a raffle and sororities and fraternities entertained audiences.
Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

Seynabou rapped and sang after the intermission. The NAACP hosted this event in honor of Black History Month on Thursday, Feb. 9, at 8 p.m. The event showcased a variety of rappers, singers and poets. Many of the performers were signed to record labels and used this as an opportunity to promote their music.
Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

An artist under the stage name of Jessica sang a song for the Concrete Jungle talent showcase hosted by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. 
Annie Goodman/The Lion's Roar

 

 

 

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