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Dancers present impromtu show

Larshell Green

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The 3rd Improvapalooza improv concert was presented by the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2 and the intermediate advance contemporary technique class taught by Skip Costa. “You have to think, ‘Oh, I’ve already done that 5,000 times, how do I do more things’ and that’s when the challenge becomes apparent,’” said Costa.

The 3rd Improvapalooza improv concert was presented by the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2 and the intermediate advance contemporary technique class taught by Skip Costa. “You have to think, ‘Oh, I’ve already done that 5,000 times, how do I do more things’ and that’s when the challenge becomes apparent,’” said Costa.
Larshell Green/The Lion's Roar

The Dance Department presented the 3rd annual Improvapalooza show in Pottle Auditorium last week. The show challenged members of the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2, and members of the university’s dance class, intermediate advance contemporary technique, to complete 12 dances without prior knowledge of music or lighting.

Student choreographers and dancers Alexis May, Lindsy Brown, Hayley Jordan, Forrest Duplantier, and Skip Costa, professor of dance, and Martie Fellom, coordinator and professor of dance, created concepts for the show. Performances were completed by them with the exception of Fellom. 

According to Costa, performers were given “maps,” to guide dancers. Maps were not explained until 6 p.m., prior to the show’s opening at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 3.

“We’re tasked by Skip to make two maps, which is like two skeletons of a dance,” said Duplantier, a senior general studies major. “We’re tasked with making it in such a way that we can give it to them an hour before the dance and it will turn out ok.” 

During the show, Costa observed how students took heed to his dance lessons. All acts were done in improv, with the exception of elements of the last piece. Students from Costa’s dance class learned this material from movement phrases they were taught during term one.

Costa opened the show with an interpretive dance, followed by solos, trios and group dances throughout. The fourth dance required audience participation. Audience members controlled movements of the tap dancers on stage by matching the color of dancer’s socks to construction paper. 

“I thought it was a really nifty idea to get the audience members involved, to make it very interactive,” said Jordan.

The concept for this dance was done by Jordan and one of her dance students, Jade Case, who enjoyed the performance and recognized elements of Jordan’s lessons on stage.

 “I liked how different it was compared to dance reviews and stuff,” said Case. “A lot of stuff we have actually done before in her class just a lot of the floor movements.”

Brown, a junior general studies major with a concentration in dance, explained that improvisation shows are different because of a change in the ability of expression. 

 “For uniqueness, you want to explore different things, but also keep your ground and your voice,” said Brown. “You don’t want to overshadow it with somebody’s principles, especially with an improv concert.”

Costa expressed the importance of throwing away material and having a knowledge of movement vocabulary in order to achieve improvement.  

“We touch on human condition,” said Costa. “The only way to create new movement is to start from scratch. Anything that you’ve already done, shown, throw that away and continue to move. Eventually, that thrown away part is gonna come back in, and you’re going to have to be educated enough to throw that back out and find new parts, adventures and journeys, ‘Where’s that taking me next.’”

The 3rd Improvapalooza improv concert was presented by the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2 and the intermediate advance contemporary technique class taught by Skip Costa. “You have to think, ‘Oh, I’ve already done that 5,000 times, how do I do more things’ and that’s when the challenge becomes apparent,’” said Costa.

The 3rd Improvapalooza improv concert was presented by the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2 and the intermediate advance contemporary technique class taught by Skip Costa. “You have to think, ‘Oh, I’ve already done that 5,000 times, how do I do more things’ and that’s when the challenge becomes apparent,’” said Costa.
Larshell Green/The Lion's Roar

The 3rd Improvapalooza improv concert was presented by the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2 and the intermediate advance contemporary technique class taught by Skip Costa. “You have to think, ‘Oh, I’ve already done that 5,000 times, how do I do more things’ and that’s when the challenge becomes apparent,’” said Costa.

The 3rd Improvapalooza improv concert was presented by the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2 and the intermediate advance contemporary technique class taught by Skip Costa. “You have to think, ‘Oh, I’ve already done that 5,000 times, how do I do more things’ and that’s when the challenge becomes apparent,’” said Costa.
Larshell Green/The Lion's Roar

The 3rd Improvapalooza improv concert was presented by the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2 and the intermediate advance contemporary technique class taught by Skip Costa. “You have to think, ‘Oh, I’ve already done that 5,000 times, how do I do more things’ and that’s when the challenge becomes apparent,’” said Costa.

The 3rd Improvapalooza improv concert was presented by the university’s dance company, Dance Performance Project 2 and the intermediate advance contemporary technique class taught by Skip Costa. “You have to think, ‘Oh, I’ve already done that 5,000 times, how do I do more things’ and that’s when the challenge becomes apparent,’” said Costa.
Larshell Green/The Lion's Roar

 

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