Diamond Girls are a key to Lions success

Diamond Girls in order from left to right, Morgan Hagan, Taylor Marceaux and Mollie Foster. Hagan and Foster have joined the squad as volunteers and assist the baseball team throughout the season in home, post season games and charity events.

Diamond Girls in order from left to right, Morgan Hagan, Taylor Marceaux and Mollie Foster. Hagan and Foster have joined the squad as volunteers and assist the baseball team throughout the season in home, post season games and charity events.
Larshell Green/The Lion's Roar

The Pat Kenelly Diamond at Alumni Field is most known for recognizing the accomplishments of the Lions baseball team. The team provides a space for women to have a place in athletics, however, this role may be misunderstood or unrecognized.

Director of Operations of the Diamond Girls, Taylor Marceaux, is a former Diamond Girl and said that every four years a new woman takes over. The senior criminal justice major who joined the squad in fall of 2013 has fulfilled that position because of her current position as director of operations for the baseball team. 

Marceaux prefers women who have good attitudes and mindsets to cheer on the team in the dugout. 

“I like when people know the game of baseball,” said Marceaux. “We like people to hold a certain standard. We’re there to keep things running smoothly, doing little things that they don’t have to worry about, so they can focus on what they’re doing on the field.”

Stereotypes of women only intending to be Diamond Girls to meet baseball players contrast the true intentions of the organization.

“People have the mindset of ‘you’re here for the guys,’ but we try to keep it a mature and professional organization,” said Marceaux. “I could never be a part of baseball as a coach or player, so this organization gives women an opportunity to be a part of something special.” 

Morgan Hagan, a sophomore social work major, has been a Diamond Girl since spring of 2015 after she heard about the position from two of her best friends. She is the current vice president of the squad.

Hagan describes being a Diamond Girl as “being there for the team and making their job a little easier for the game.” Her love for baseball stems from a connection with her dad and a prior interest in the sport.

“I’ve always watched baseball and my dad had a real love for the sport,” said Hagan. “When I told my dad he was ecstatic.”

Hagan said that since the definition of a Diamond Girl is not usually known, she describes her position on the squad as a voluntary but rewarding duty. 

“Watching it from the dugout, that’s a view you’re not gonna get from the stands,” said Hagan. “They kind of form a brotherhood, and the Diamond Girls have formed a sisterhood. A lot of people don’t know what it is. They ask ‘do we work for the team,’ but we volunteer to help them, there’s no pay.” 

Current president of the Diamond Girls, Mollie Foster, joined the squad in fall of 2013 as a freshman. She heard about the position after a coworker, who was a Diamond Girl, suggested that she join.

“I wasn’t going to be in a sorority because I’m not into that, so I decided to be a Diamond Girl and used that as a way to get involved,” said Foster, a family and consumer sciences major. “In a way, you kind of feel like you’re a part of the team. They always thank you when they win. Southeastern is a D1 school, so it is kind of a big deal to be able to be out here with the players and coaches.”

Foster admitted that her entire family enjoyed sports, and she played softball when she was younger.

“My uncle was a professional baseball player and coached college baseball,” said Foster. “He played for the Dodgers and the Twins professionally and played college ball at Mississippi State. My whole family enjoys sports. I played softball when I was younger.”

Requirements for being a Diamond Girl include having a 2.0 GPA, being available to volunteer with the squad and being a full time student at the university. According to Marceaux, Diamond Girls must work about ten games per season, help pick up balls, helmets and bats, retrieve foul balls and provide services to umpires during games. 

“Me and Mollie chose the Diamond Girls,” said Marceaux. “It’s not a strict program. It’s more of if you meet the requirements, if you don’t break your policies, we basically let in anyone. If they do a good job throughout the season, they’ll be invited back.”

The Diamond Girls conducted an informational meeting on Monday, Oct. 3 at 6 p.m. in the Dugas Center for University Athletics. Current Diamond Girls explained their roles and answered questions from hopeful Diamond Girls.

Contact the Diamond Girls by email at [email protected] for more information about the next interest meeting or visit them on Instagram at seludiamondgirls.

An application and policy packet are currently available online for the 2017 Southeastern Diamond Girls squad at lionsports.net.