Tutoring hours expand to fit students’ schedules

Students+study+in+the+Sims+Memorial+Library.+To+help+meet+students%27+needs%2C+the+Center+for+Student+Excellence+will+provide+drop-in+tutoring+sessions+on+Mondays+from+6-9+p.m.+at+the+library.
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Tutoring hours expand to fit students’ schedules

Students study in the Sims Memorial Library. To help meet students' needs, the Center for Student Excellence will provide drop-in tutoring sessions on Mondays from 6-9 p.m. at the library.

Students study in the Sims Memorial Library. To help meet students' needs, the Center for Student Excellence will provide drop-in tutoring sessions on Mondays from 6-9 p.m. at the library.

File Photo/The Lion's Roar

Students study in the Sims Memorial Library. To help meet students' needs, the Center for Student Excellence will provide drop-in tutoring sessions on Mondays from 6-9 p.m. at the library.

File Photo/The Lion's Roar

File Photo/The Lion's Roar

Students study in the Sims Memorial Library. To help meet students' needs, the Center for Student Excellence will provide drop-in tutoring sessions on Mondays from 6-9 p.m. at the library.

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A demand for additional tutoring hours in math and chemistry subjects motivated the Center for Student Excellence to open up another time slot for students.

After expanding to provide services at the Sims Memorial Library on Sundays last year, CSE now offers tutoring on Mondays at the same location and time.

For some students, the three-hour drop-in session between 6-9 p.m. is easier to attend than the regular, scheduled tutoring hours at CSE.

Carolyn Blackwood, learning assistance coordinator of CSE, explained the reason behind extending drop-in tutoring hours to Monday this semester.

Blackwood said, “We had a very positive response to the usage for Sunday nights, and if I can give you this as a theory, I thought that people coming in on Sunday night were preparing for Monday classes, whereas somebody on Monday might be preparing for Tuesday classes. So, that was just a normal progression for me.”

Choosing the library as a location happened naturally.

“We needed a secure building that had ample space, and when you look across campus, that’s kind of a limited item,” explained Blackwood. “I didn’t want my staff working in an isolated building. I think they needed to be in a building that was highly populated.”

Angela Balius, reference/outreach and instructional media librarian, was glad for the new tutoring session, which will be taking place outside of the Mathematics Tutoring Lab on the second floor.

“We realized that so many students work, and they have full schedules,” shared Balius. “They may not be able to make it during the normal daytime hours at the tutoring lab. So, this is a big win for students and for the tutoring center and the library because we’re already here. We’re open at two on Sundays. So, it just makes sense for us to host it, and we’re happy too.”

Balius explained the benefit of the walk-in tutoring sessions.

“It really appeals to the busy student who has a lot going on,” said Balius. “They don’t have to commit to an appointment time. It’s totally drop in. We’re here when you’re ready, and that seems to be working out.”

Although the sessions do not require prescheduling, students may find themselves working in groups.

“It’s not necessarily one-on-one service,” said Blackwood. “They’re there to help you, but you’re working with possibility of several other students with the same tutor.”

To be able to meet the demand without excessive tutor sharing, nine tutors will be available at the sessions on Monday, and 10 tutors will be available during the Sunday evening sessions. The tutoring will cover math courses 98-241 and chemistry courses 101-266 excluding 108.

Balius, who has a count of about 20 students attending the Monday sessions, discussed the possibility of extending tutoring hours yet again.

“In our world, anything’s possible, and when we see a need, we’re gonna try to fill it, and if students are responding to it, we’ll make it happen,” stated Balius.