University reports high summer enrollment numbers

This+summer+the+number+of+continuing+undergraduate+students+enrolled+in+the+university+increased+by+15.3%25+compared+to+last+year.+%E2%80%9CWe+made+strategic+decisions+that+we+suspected+would+lead+to+this+outcome%2C%E2%80%9D+said+Dr.+Kay+Maurin%2C+chief+enrollment+management+officer.+%E2%80%9CWe+were+very+pleased+with+the+results%2C+and+it+was+our+desired+outcome.%E2%80%9D%C2%A0

Symiah Dorsey/The Lion's Roar

This summer the number of continuing undergraduate students enrolled in the university increased by 15.3% compared to last year. “We made strategic decisions that we suspected would lead to this outcome,” said Dr. Kay Maurin, chief enrollment management officer. “We were very pleased with the results, and it was our desired outcome.” 

Despite the extension of distance learning into the summer, the university reported its largest enrollment growth for the summer semester since 2014. 

According to a university press release, the number of continuing undergraduate students who enrolled in classes for the summer semester has increased by 15.3% compared to last year. 

Dr. Kay Maurin, chief enrollment management officer, explained that the increased number of enrollments comes as a result of the university offering several financial incentives. 

“We made strategic decisions that we suspected would lead to this outcome,” said Maurin. “We were very pleased with the results, and it was our desired outcome.” 

The university provided a waiver of several application fees to accommodate students in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. These include a waiver of the $130.25 assessed fees, a waiver of the $4,680 non-resident fees for students taking nine credit hours, $6238.80 non-resident fees for students taking 12 credit hours and a general $300 summer online savings waiver. 

Maurin elaborated on the savings that the university provided for students. 

 

Advertisement


 

“These savings, combined with the Summer Smart scholarship, resulted in valuable savings for students,” explained Maurin. 

Abby Songy, a junior family and consumer sciences major, decided to enroll in summer classes upon finding out about the waivers. 

“I never intended on taking summer classes during my undergraduate career,” said Songy. “In May, I realized that courses were being offered without certain fees due to COVID-19, and I started to scroll through my LEONet. I had been scheduled to graduate in December 2021, but if I took classes this summer, I could graduate in July 2021. I took this opportunity and ran with it.”

Songy is currently enrolled in nine hours for the summer semester. She noted that despite the circumstances and continuation of distance learning, her classes have gone well.

“My professors have been readily available to answer all questions, and they reach out to us on a regular basis,” explained Songy. “Taking summer classes has been a great experience.” 

Jacob Deliberto, a senior marketing major, is currently enrolled in classes for the summer semester. He shared that the ongoing pandemic did not affect his decision to take classes over the summer. 

“Taking online classes over the summer is something that I have been doing since my freshman year,” said Deliberto. 

Deliberto also described how his online classes during the summer are different from his online classes during the spring semester. 

“The only difference from distance learning last semester and my summer courses are the required class times,” explained Deliberto. “During the distance learning, my 8 a.m. class stayed the same. But now, my 8 a.m. class is provided with a pre-recorded lecture that I can watch at any time throughout the week.”

The 2020 Fall Semester begins on August 17.

 

Advertisement