The influence of women in literature

Dr.+Sarah+Schillage-Truxillo%2C+instructor+of+English%2C+focused+on+literature+by+women+in+antiquity+for+her+part+on+the+panel+in+the+Sims+Memorial+Library.+The+panel+included+faculty+from+the+Department+of+English+to+discuss+topics+related+to+Women%27s+History+Month.+
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The influence of women in literature

Dr. Sarah Schillage-Truxillo, instructor of English, focused on literature by women in antiquity for her part on the panel in the Sims Memorial Library. The panel included faculty from the Department of English to discuss topics related to Women's History Month.

Dr. Sarah Schillage-Truxillo, instructor of English, focused on literature by women in antiquity for her part on the panel in the Sims Memorial Library. The panel included faculty from the Department of English to discuss topics related to Women's History Month.

Zachary Araki/The Lion's Roar

Dr. Sarah Schillage-Truxillo, instructor of English, focused on literature by women in antiquity for her part on the panel in the Sims Memorial Library. The panel included faculty from the Department of English to discuss topics related to Women's History Month.

Zachary Araki/The Lion's Roar

Zachary Araki/The Lion's Roar

Dr. Sarah Schillage-Truxillo, instructor of English, focused on literature by women in antiquity for her part on the panel in the Sims Memorial Library. The panel included faculty from the Department of English to discuss topics related to Women's History Month.

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In celebration of Women’s History Month, faculty members from the Department of English stimulated discussions about the influence of feminism and works of literature by women.

Dr. Sarah Schillage-Truxillo, instructor of English, Randall Frederick, lecturer of English, Bruce Craft, instructor of English, and Alexander Brickler, instructor of English, formed a panel on the third floor of the Sims Memorial Library on March 27 from 5-7 p.m.

Stephanie Fernandez, a junior criminal justice major, believes everyone should hear about the topics at the panel.

“They put an example with family wise, like what your family in the past has gone through,” said Fernandez. “It’s more like they put experiences of how it was before, and now it has changed. it’s more examples of how it went through before.”

Besides a celebration for the month, the panel also aimed to foster discussion.

“For me as a teacher, these are things I don’t often get to cover in my classroom, so this provides an opportunity to expose students to literature and just things that are still relevant,” shared Schillage-Truxillo. “For my topic, I focused on women in antiquity, but the issues that the writers I was talking about dealt with and wrote about are still issues that women are facing today. So, it’s to just kind of introduce people to literature they may not have been familiar with.”